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Regular Rules | "Jeez Clusters Joys"
    What happens when faded melodies encounter a massive sonic pandemonium... when Kathryn Beaumont meets the dark side of Vito Corleone? The answer lies in the debut album of Regular Rules entitled "Jeez Clusters Joys". Nuggets of improvised jazz worked to noisy patterns of moderate hardness, given in a well-set cerebral manner. It goes without saying that this greco-belgian collaboration between Ilan Manouach and Gilles Mortiaux can meet the discerning ears of listeners who have a slight obsession with the special.
music by
Regular Rules, 2009

title
Jeez Clusters Joys

contents
1. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 1 06:26
2. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 2 13:52
3. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 3 11:43
4. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 4 03:21
5. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 5 06:38
6. Jeez Clusters Joys, part 6 04:14

total duration
46:15
instrumentation
Ilan Manouach alto sax, effects
Gilles Mortiaux electric guitar, samples

recording
by Manolis Manousakis, at Studio Maco, in Athens

mastering
Themistoklis Pantelopoulos & Regular Rules, April 2009

graphic
Ilan Manouach, April 2009

inlay photos
Rutu and Creamyfalcon
catalogue number
TRB.018

release date
April 24, 2009

format
CDR
status
available

order
reviews

Dolf Mulder | Vital Weekly | issue 737 | June 2010
    Regular Rules is a duo of Gilles Mortiaux from Brussels, Belgium and Ilan Manouach from Athens, Greece. They are a free-jazz hardcore unit, assisted on stage by numerous others. Loud and noisy improvisations is their business. Mortiaux provides thick layers of guitar noise and Manouach plays saxophones. Both add effects and samples. Their thick and massive sound improvisations worked well for me. Their agressive playing on guitar and saxes is combined very effectively with extreme noisy sound effects or contrasting samples like in the beginning of the opening track (pieces have no titles). Both musicians give all of their unbound power and creativity in these six improvisations. In track 5 both players take their own route in the first part of the improvisation. Later on they start to built something together. The highlight of the album for me is track 4. It is almost a song. But very bizarre. Yes, Mortiaux and Manouach make a strong statement of maniacal over the top soundsculpting, resulting in some very powerful collages.